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compoundchem:

Following on from the previous graphic looking at glowsticks, today’s takes a look at luminol, and how it can be used to detect blood (and, er, horseradish): http://wp.me/s4aPLT-luminol

compoundchem:

Following on from the previous graphic looking at glowsticks, today’s takes a look at luminol, and how it can be used to detect blood (and, er, horseradish): http://wp.me/s4aPLT-luminol

malformalady:

Naomi Elishuv had played for a number of orchestras, including Lithuanian National Symphony Orchestra, but was forced to stop performing professionally two decades ago when she began suffering from a condition called essential tremor. During the procedure which was performed under local anaesthetic, surgeons asked Elishuv to play so her brain was active. The footage shows Elishuv shaking and struggling to play the violin before she is wheeled into surgery. Surgeons are then seen operating on her brain behind a huge plastic curtain. As soon as the procedure is complete, the violinist’s hands become steady, and she is able to play unhindered for the first time in 20 years.

malformalady:

Naomi Elishuv had played for a number of orchestras, including Lithuanian National Symphony Orchestra, but was forced to stop performing professionally two decades ago when she began suffering from a condition called essential tremor. During the procedure which was performed under local anaesthetic, surgeons asked Elishuv to play so her brain was active. The footage shows Elishuv shaking and struggling to play the violin before she is wheeled into surgery. Surgeons are then seen operating on her brain behind a huge plastic curtain. As soon as the procedure is complete, the violinist’s hands become steady, and she is able to play unhindered for the first time in 20 years.

(Source: ix7s018y3fhigoxg)

jtotheizzoe:

spacetravelco:

The First Lady Astronaut Trainees / Mercury 13

"The men go off and fight the wars and fly the airplanes and come back and help design and build and test them. The fact that women are not in this field is a fact of our social order."

- John Glenn of the Mercury 7, testifying before a House subcommittee in 1962

"The women underwent the identical tests that the male candidates had undergone. In the end, 68% of the women passed with ‘no medical reservations’ compared to 56% of the men. The 13 females who passed were known as the Mercury 13. They were Bernice ‘Bea’ Steadman, Janey Hart, Geraldine ‘Jerri’ Sloan Truhill, Rhea Allison Woltman, Sarah Lee Gorelick Ratley, Jan Dietrich, Marion Dietrich, Myrtle Cagle, Irene Leverton, Gene Nora Jessen, Jean Hixson, Wally Funk and Geraldyn ‘Jerrie’ Cobb…

Cobb had tested in the top 2% of all tested candidates, male and female.”

The Lovelace Woman in Space Program (1960-1962)

Amazing, I had never heard of this!

(Source: mercury13.com)

ceruleancynic:

medieval:

Completely out of context crop of the week.
14th c.
(via)


the expressions in this are perfect
what do you want to do with him?
idk, what do you want to do with him? i told you this would happen
he suffers from hysterical conehead rigidity and you just had to put that party hat on him didn’t you
sometimes i don’t think you like me to be happy

ceruleancynic:

medieval:

Completely out of context crop of the week.

14th c.

(via)

the expressions in this are perfect

what do you want to do with him?

idk, what do you want to do with him? i told you this would happen

he suffers from hysterical conehead rigidity and you just had to put that party hat on him didn’t you

sometimes i don’t think you like me to be happy

bijoux-et-mineraux:


Brochantite with Linarite - La Farola mine, Chile

bijoux-et-mineraux:

Brochantite with Linarite - La Farola mine, Chile

(Source: ebay.com)

archiemcphee:

Seattle-based artist Carol Milne knits with glass, or rather, she creates wonderful glass sculptures that make it seem as though she’s either a superhuman glass knitter or in possession of enchanted knitting needles and very specialized gloves. The reality is actually much more complicated, but no less awesome. Milne invented her glass knitting technique back in 2006. It’s a process that involves knitting with wax instead of glass, followed by lost-wax casting, mold-making and kiln-casting.

First, a model of the sculpture is made from wax which is then encased by a refractory mold material that can withstand extremely high temperatures. Next, hot steam is used to melt the wax, leaving behind an empty cavity in the shape of the artwork. Pieces of room temperature glass are then placed inside the mold which is then heated to 1,400-1,600 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the type of glass. Afterward, the piece is slowly cooled over a period of several weeks, followed by a careful excavation process, where Milne delicately chips away like an archaeologist to reveal the final piece.

To check out more of Carol Milne’s extraordinary artwork visit the Glass Art SocietyMilne’s Facebook page or her online gallery.

[via Colossal]

galaxyshmalaxy:

Rosette Nebula - 9 Mar 13 (by Astro Steve)

galaxyshmalaxy:

Rosette Nebula - 9 Mar 13 (by Astro Steve)

Fairytale science

materialsworld:

image

Huff off: Straw houses are stronger than you were told… 

imageaterials science is everywhere, and you’ve been learning about it for longer than you’d think.

The first little pig built his house out of straw; the second out of sticks; but it was the cunning third pig, a bricklayer, who taught us all an important lesson about materials selection. In reality, however, the Big Bad Wolf would have dizzied and passed out long before first house succumbed to his huffs and puffs.

Straw houses have been built since the Paleolithic Era on the African plains, and have seen spikes in popularity since – the invention of the mechanical hay baler saw a straw-bale construction craze towards the end of the 19th century, and more recently there has been something of a revival, as alternative materials are considered to improve sustainability.

Straw is an excellent insulator. On top of that it’s cheap, easily available and – an increasingly important word ­– sustainable. The BaleHaus at the University of Bath, which was opened by Kevin McCloud in 2009, was built as a research project in collaboration with industrial partner ModCell, using straw and hemp bale panels. This nifty short video explains the basic principle.

As well as demonstrating fantastic thermal and acoustic performance, in a simulation using hydraulic jacks, the BaleHaus was successfully tested for its resistance to hurricane-force wind levels up to 193kph (120mph). That’s a big set of wolf lungs.

image

You dropped something: This flamboyant chap had better watch his step – that doesn’t look like toughened glass to me… 

In a more tongue-in-check scientific evaluation of fairytale lore, Antariksh Bothale, a mechanical engineer in Bombay, asked ‘What qualities would the glass in Cinderella’s slippers need to have in order for her to walk and dance comfortably (and hold her weight)?’

Bothale’s investigation is a bit of fun, but an impressively thorough one. He considers the yield strengths of different forms of glass compared with the comparative stresses that would develop in the material under Cinderella’s estimated maximum weight of 50kg.image

Bending glass: Assuming her stepping angle is around 30°, Bothale claims only half of Cinderella’s weight (500 sin 30) would act in the normal direction of the heel…

His studies accounted for the bending that would be applied to her heel causing compressive stress, the increased impact force when she runs out of the castle as midnight approaches… after contemplating all of this and more, Bothale settled on thermally toughened glass to take Cinders to the ball, recommending that she stick to a toe-first foot strike. Take a look at his full assessment here – it even sparked some comment-based debate.

By Simon Frost

jtotheizzoe:

Tune in NOW (like right now) to watch a livestream of Comet Siding Spring on its ridiculously close approach to Mars this afternoon! This dirty snowball will pass about three times closer to Mars than our Moon orbits Earth!
The Slooh community telescope is currently live-streaming the comet’s approach with commentary from astrobiologist David Grinspoon!
(artist’s rendition of comet over Mars via NASA)

jtotheizzoe:

Tune in NOW (like right now) to watch a livestream of Comet Siding Spring on its ridiculously close approach to Mars this afternoon! This dirty snowball will pass about three times closer to Mars than our Moon orbits Earth!

The Slooh community telescope is currently live-streaming the comet’s approach with commentary from astrobiologist David Grinspoon!

(artist’s rendition of comet over Mars via NASA)